Success of Paris Agreement depends on Sumatran forests: Harrison Ford

Success of Paris Agreement depends on Sumatran forests: Harrison Ford

Vice Chair of the Conservation International (CI) Harrison Ford expresses his support for a research on climate and customary community to curb emissions and control climate change during the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) 2018 in San Francisco, the United States, on Thursday (Sept 13). ANTARA FOTO/ Virna P Setyorini/aww/2018.

San Francisco, (ANTARA News) - One of the keys to the success of the implementation of the Paris Agreement depends on the condition of the Sumatran forests, Conservation International (CI) vice chair Harrison Ford said at the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) in San Francisco on Thursday.

"As long as forests in Sumatra and Brazil are still burning, the GHG emission reduction target is difficult to achieve," Ford stated.

The actor, who played Indiana Jones, said nothing is more important in the world than stopping the global community from damaging the forests.

Because protecting and restoring forests can be "carbon sink", which means representing 30 percent of what must be done to avoid catastrophes.

Currently, he added, the only possible solution to absorb carbon on a global scale is by protecting forests.

"If we cannot protect the forest, we cannot protect ourselves," Ford remarked.

Furthermore, he said it was necessary to conserve the forest at every level of government policy to achieve climate change control targets.

Investment in managing the mangroves, tropical forests, together with developing new renewable energy, stopping damage to ecosystems, committing to securing ecosystems for the future, conducting research and reforestation such as pursuing research for carbon storage and capture are among the efforts that need to be made.

It is also important to empower indigenous communities, use their knowledge, safeguard their cultural and land heritage, as well as respect and ensure their rights, Ford continued.

What is happening now is that fishermen in Colombia and those in Somalia are suffering due to climate change. While the United States on the east coast faced storms, western California suffered from forest fires.

"If we want to survive on earth, we need nature more than ever before. Nature does not need humans, but humans need nature. So, let`s take care of our forests and nature," the environmentalist noted.

Ford was the last speaker of the "Opening Plenary: A Brighter Future" session on the first day of GCAS.

He spoke after the UN Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael R. Bloomberg.

Reporting by Virna P. Setyorini
Editing by Yashinta Difa Pramudyani

 

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