Indonesian president observes Lampung's tsunami-hit areas

Indonesian president observes Lampung's tsunami-hit areas

President Joko Widodo (center) met with local residents in a visit to the Sunda Strait tsunami-hit area in Kunjir Village, Rajabasa, South Lampung, Lampung, on Wednesday (2/1/2019). ANTARA PHOTO/Wahyu Putro A/foc.

Bandarlampung, Lampung, (ANTARA News) - President Joko Widodo arrived at the Radin Inten II Airport in Lampung Province on Wednesday morning to observe the ongoing efforts to restore areas most affected by a deadly tsunami on December 22, 2018.

Wearing a white shirt, jeans, and a pair of sneakers, the incumbent president, commonly known as Jokowi, directly went to Kunjir Village in Rajabasa Sub-district, South Lampung District, one of the areas most affected by the Sunda Strait Tsunami.

The tsunami that struck following the eruption of Mount Anak Krakatau also hit certain coastal areas of Banten Province, killing at least 437 people, wounding 7,202 others, and forcing 34,817 people to take refuge.

In the two provinces, the areas most affected by the deadly tsunami included the districts of Pandeglang, Serang, South Lampung, Tenggamus, and Pesawaran.

During his visit to Kunjir Village, Jokowi, who seeks a reelection in this year`s presidential election, observed the outcomes of those working hard to restore the areas.

After visiting the village, the president continued his trip to Way Muli Village before meeting with local residents displaced by the tsunami in a hall in Kalianda Sub-district, South Lampung District.

During a visit to Lampung Province, he was accompanied by several cabinet members and top-ranking officials, including Health Minister Nila F. Moeleok, Social Affairs Minister Agus Gumiwang Kartasasmita, and Public Works and Housing Minister Basuki Hadimuljono.

Presidential Chief of Staff Moeldoko also joined the visit that Jokowi made after he visited the areas most affected by the Sunda Strait Tsunami in Banten Province recently.

Indonesia lies on the Circum-Pacific Belt, which is also known as the Ring of Fire, where several tectonic plates meet and cause frequent volcanic and seismic activities.

As a result, several parts of the archipelago are prone to earthquakes, as could be observed from last year`s deadly earthquakes in Lombok Island, West Nusa Tenggara Province, and Palu, the capital city of Central Sulawesi Province.

Reporting by Hanni Sofia, Rahmad Nasution

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