BBKSDA confirms ensnared Sumatran tiger on path to recovery

BBKSDA confirms ensnared Sumatran tiger on path to recovery

The snare wounds are healing at a good rate, and it seems that new tissue has started to grow over them,
Pekanbaru (ANTARA) - A Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris) that had suffered grave injury in the left leg after being trapped in a hunters' snare is showing signs of recovery, according to Riau's Center for Natural Resources Conservation (BBKSDA).

"The snare wounds are healing at a good rate, and it seems that new tissue has started to grow over them," Head of Riau BBKSDA Suharyono remarked in Pekanbaru on Friday.

Suharyono confirmed that the wild tiger named Inung Rio had been quarantined during a 14-day period, starting March 29.

The rare animal species has begun engaging in normal activities and has a decent appetite.

Suharyono remarked that treatment for Inung was ongoing.

Earlier diagnosis of Inung's wound pointed to a systemic infection arising from open sores on the left leg, and hepatic infection involving the liver. Further diagnosis is being planned to corroborate the temporary diagnosis, according to Suharyono.

Sumatran tigers were earlier caught in the Riau ecosystem restoration area (RER) under the management of PT Gemilang Cipta Nusantara (GCN) in Sangar Village, Teluk Meranti Sub-District, Pelalawan District, in March.

The male tiger, with an estimated age of three to four years, suffered serious injury in the left front leg and was moved to the Dhamasraya Sumatran Tiger Rehabilitation Center (PR-HSD) in West Sumatra for further treatment.

Medical records from Riau BBKSDA medical officers, West Sumatra BKSDA, and Arsyari Foundation / PRHSD indicated that the tiger Inung had developed three open wounds, or lacerations, in the medial part of the left leg.

This injury is the worst form and a stage-three infection, with the formation of necrotic tissue or decaying tissue, measuring four centimeters (cm) in diameter and three-cm deep.

On examining the medical record, the medical team detected that the Sumatran tiger had developed a tumor in the lower side of the mouth, and further laboratory examination will be conducted to confirm if it is malignant or benign in nature.

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