Indonesian embassy in Yemen shuts, shifts to Oman

Indonesian embassy in Yemen shuts, shifts to Oman

Teuku Faizasyah, spokesman of the Indonesian Foreign Affairs Ministry. (Antara/Yashinta Difa/FA)

Jakarta (ANTARA) - President Joko Widodo (Jokowi) signed a decree of temporary closure for security reasons of the Indonesian embassy in Sana'a, the capital of Yemen, on July 17, 2019, and shifted its embassy to Muscat, Oman. Although the embassy was closed four years ago, the government just made it official by issuing a presidential decree No 18 Year 2019.

The embassy in Sana'a had been de facto closed since 2015 following a bombing that seriously damaged the embassy building and injured three persons, Teuku Faizasyah, spokesman of the Indonesian Foreign Affairs Ministry, said in a statement here Thursday.

Following the explosion, all activities have been taken over by the embassy in Muscat.

The embassy was temporarily closed given the security and political situation in Yemen which is dangerous and could hamper the implementation of its diplomatic mission and tasks in the Arab country.

Based on the presidential decree effective since January 1, 2019, the tasks and staff of the embassy in Sana'a have been moved to the embassy in Muscat.

The embassy will be reopened when the condition in Yemen returns to normal.

Yemen has been in the grip of a devastating power struggle between the Saudi-Emirati backed government and Iran-aligned Houthi fighters since late 2014, the Aljazeera news reported.

The conflict has intensified since 2015 when the Houthis advanced on the deposed government's temporary base in the city of Aden, prompting Saudi Arabia and its allies to start a military campaign against the group.

As the conflict enters its fourth year, over 22 million people — or three-quarters of the population —need urgent humanitarian aid and protection, with tens of thousands of civilians having been killed.

The conflict is taking an enormous toll on Yemen’s civilian population, who face indiscriminate attacks, bombing, sniper attacks, kidnapping, rape and arbitrary detention, among other dangers.

Some two million people remain displaced across the country. Internally displaced people are more vulnerable to exploitation and abuse.  

 

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