RI highlights prevalent problem of breast cancer in developing nations

RI highlights prevalent problem of breast cancer in developing nations

Indonesian Health Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin while addressing the last day of the Southeast Asia Breast Cancer Symposium (SEABCS) 2021 on Sunday.   (1/8/2021). (ANTARA/HO-YKPI).

I am convinced that by cooperating to build our strength and allocating sufficient resources to that effect, we will achieve better results to control breast cancer in the Southeast Asian region (in particular) and in the world (in general).
Jakarta (ANTARA) - Breast cancer remains a major problem in developing nations following a report of 685 thousand women dying of the disease globally last year, according to Indonesian Health Minister Budi Gunadi Sadikin.

"The joint commitment and responsibility of all stakeholders are indispensable to ensuring successful prevention and control of breast cancer through health promotion, screening, early detection, and standard treatment," he remarked during an address at the last day of the Southeast Asia Breast Cancer Symposium (SEABCS) 2021 on Sunday.

Reports from the World Health Organization (WHO) and Global Cancer Observatory 2020 showed that some 2.3 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer and 685 thousand of them died of the disease worldwide last year

"I am convinced that by cooperating to build our strength and allocating sufficient resources to that effect, we will achieve better results to control breast cancer in the Southeast Asian region (in particular) and in the world (in general)," he stated.

Related news: Early detection effective to prevent risk of developing breast cancer

Dr Julie Torode of the Institute of Cancer Policy/Kings College in London highlighted the importance of early detection of breast cancer among women.

The institute reported the presence of 18.1 million new cancer patients worldwide, of which 48.4 percent were found in Asia. Nearly 57.3 percent of the 9.6 million cancer-related deaths were found in Asia.

"The keywords that become the focus of attention are equity, integration, and improving the quality of health services," Torode stated.

Dr Benjamin Anderson, the WHO representative, opined that the greatest challenge to tackling breast cancer is how to increase the survival rate through facilitating reintegration, overcoming stigma and providing financial support and palliative care

"Thus, to make it effective, the early detection of breast cancer must be followed up effectively and timely, accompanied by supporting care and services," he stated. Related news: Bio Farma to produce breast cancer biosimilar at lower price

 

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