Malaysian citizen caught trying to smuggle 11,877 ecstasy pills

Malaysian citizen caught trying to smuggle 11,877 ecstasy pills

Ecstasy pills. (ANTARA/Irsan Mulyadi)

We are still investigating his network in coordination with the National Police Headquarters and the Malaysian Police."
Batam, Riau Islands (ANTARA News) - A Malaysian citizen of Indian descent, MR, was caught at the Batam Center Ferry Port carrying 11,877 ecstasy pills worth around Rp3 billion.

"The ecstasy pills, concealed in four bags, were found wrapped around his legs," Riau Islands Polices Head of Narcotics Division Director Senior Commissioner Agus Rohmat stated here on Thursday.

MR arrived aboard a ferry boat from Setulang Laut, in Johor, Malaysia, at the Batam Center Ferry Port on Wednesday night, he added.

"While passing through an X-Ray inspection, the officers got suspicious of his moves. He is short-statured, but was wearing baggy trousers," he noted.

After being checked, he was caught with ecstasy pills, which he intended to hand over to someone at the port, he claimed.

During the interrogation, he revealed that he was ordered by a Malaysian citizen, known as M, to carry the illegal narcotic drugs to Batam, which were meant to be handed over to G, who was waiting for the consignment at the Batam port.

"However, the officials caught him red-handed, before he had the opportunity to hand over the consignment to the concerned party. We are on the lookout for G, who is also a Malaysian citizen," Agus remarked.

Although he admitted that this was his first attempt to deliver the ecstasy pills to Batam in exchange for a payment of three thousand Malaysian Ringgit, his passport, however, revealed that he had actually entered Batam with the same drug on three earlier occasions.

Agus pointed out that MR would be charged for violating articles in laws on narcotics, psychotropics, and health, which carries a maximum death penalty.

"We are still investigating his network in coordination with the National Police Headquarters and the Malaysian Police," Agus claimed.

The Batam Center, which has a direct shipping line to Malaysia, has often been used as an entry gate by international narcotic networks.

The narcotic networks have also frequently used Indonesian migrant workers, who were planning to return home, as carriers for bringing the illegal stuff for later distribution to other regions in the country, he stated.

(Reporting by Larno/H-YH/INE/KR-BSR/S012)

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