Bengkulu conservation office releases slow loris, eagle into wild

Bengkulu conservation office releases slow loris, eagle into wild

The Bengkulu Natural Resources Conservation Office (BKSDA) releases a male Sunda slow loris to the Bukit Kaba Eco-tourism Park (TWA) in Rejang Lebong District. ANTARA/HO-BKSDA Bengkulu

Rejang Lebong, Bengkulu (ANTARA) - The Bengkulu Natural Resources Conservation Office (BKSDA) released a male Sunda slow loris and a male black eagle into the Bukit Kaba Eco-tourism Park (TWA) in Rejang Lebong District.

The release of the Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang) and black eagle (Ictinaetus malayensis) into the wild several days ago was part of the endeavors to restore the park’s function and ecosystem, Said Jauhari, head of the Conservation Section I of the Bengkulu BKSDA, stated here on Thursday.

The conservation office examined the health of the two protected animals and reviewed the feasibility of the ecotourism park as a habitat before releasing them.

The BKSDA zeroed in on the Bukit Kaba TWA as a release site since the area is well-protected and in good condition. It has copious food sources, perching and nesting places, as well as an environment to support the breeding of animals.

They have also ensured that the release of slow loris and black eagles will not disrupt the natural balance of the ecosystem in the Bukit Kaba TWA. Black eagles inhabit lowland, evergreen, and montane forests, up to four thousand meters above sea level. They prefer slopes and mountainous country regions and areas with forest cover.

Approximately 10 thousand to 100 thousand birds are spread across northeastern Pakistan and the base of the Himalayas through Bhutan, India, and Sri Lanka, and down into Malaysia and Indonesia.

The Sunda slow loris, also known as the greater slow loris, is native to parts of Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore.

Locals in these regions know the Sunda slow loris by other names. Its scientific name, coucang, is derived from its common name in Indonesian, kukang. However, it is also known there as malu-malu, which means “shy”.

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