Folklore can help children get to know Indonesian culture: ministry

Folklore can help children get to know Indonesian culture: ministry

Director of early childhood education at the Ministry of Education, Culture, Research, and Technology (Kemendikbudristek), Muhammad Hasbi, at the Indonesia Mendongeng press conference. (ANTARA) 

Children will learn to appreciate literary works and develop awareness about culture
Jakarta (ANTARA) - Folklore can help children get acquainted with Indonesian culture in a fun way, director of early childhood education at the Ministry of Education, Culture, Research, and Technology, Muhammad Hasbi, has said.

 

Folklore, which is a part of the country's rich cultural diversity, can serve as a source of more than just entertainment for children, he said.

 

"In the era of globalization, culture has begun to erode; to help preserve Indonesian culture, fairy tales based on folklore can be introduced from an early age so that children can get to know Indonesian culture," Hasbi said at an online press conference on Thursday.

 

Through folklore, children's cognitive development will improve as they will get to listen and understand various cultures' reflections, which will also reflect the uniqueness of Indonesia's immensely diverse culture, Hasbi said.

 

Folklore could instill confidence and moral values in children, he added.


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"Children will learn to appreciate literary works and develop awareness about culture," he said.

 

Kemendikbudristek is encouraging parents to tell stories because they can provide many benefits to children, Hasbi said. In addition to strengthening the bond between parents and children, fairy tales can also be a source for entertainment that invoke laughter and a means to provide character education to children, he added.

 

"For example, when the story is about good and bad characters, children are invited to instill good behavior from the characters," he explained.

 

In early childhood education, storytelling is part of learning activities that aim to improve children's literacy skills from an early age, Hasbi said. Through storytelling, children are invited to develop their imagination skills, enhance their understanding of stories, and capture moral messages, he added.


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"Fairy tales can be a strategy to give advice to children without being patronizing," Hasbi remarked.

 

Children who often hear fairy tales can improve their vocabulary and communication skills, and gain new insights, Hasbi said. Therefore, the Ministry of Education and Culture is encouraging storytelling activities to promote a culture of literacy in families and educational units, he informed.

 

"Through storytelling, we are able to build activities that shape our children to get optimal growth and development stimulation," he remarked.


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