IDI urges civil society to support healthcare workers

IDI urges civil society to support healthcare workers

Dr. Moh Adib Khumaidi, chairman of IDI's mitigation team.

Jakarta (ANTARA) - The Indonesian Medical Association (IDI) has said it is working with civil society organization Anak Bangsa Peduli to support the nation's healthcare workers by providing items such as personal protective equipment (PPEs).

"Friends, more than three thousand doctors have been exposed to (COVID-19). This July, quite many (doctors) have had to undergo self-isolation. This is an obligation of this organization (to help them), with the support of civil society. We support this," Dr. Moh Adib Khumaidi, chairman of IDI's mitigation team, said at a press conference here on Tuesday.

According to the team's data, as of July 17 this year, 1,323 Indonesian healthcare workers have succumbed to the coronavirus, he informed.

He then called on civil society groups to help meet the needs of healthcare workers conducting self-isolation across the country. They are also facing difficulty in getting vitamins and medicines during quarantine, he said.

"Those in self-isolation should make sure that (their health condition) does not get worse. They must have access to medicines. We have faced difficulty even in obtaining antibiotics and vitamins. We are trying to get support," he added.

The IDI has launched a call center (number 0859106505279) for healthcare workers contracting COVID-19, Khumaidi said. Those in self-isolation will be given aid packages, he added.

He also called for the launch of a movement to support and protect healthcare workers across regions. The IDI will also collaborate with other organizations, such as the Indonesian Nurses' Association (PPNI), to promote the call to support healthcare workers, he said.

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"We hope that it (the movement to help healthcare workers) will become a role model that could be followed by every party to support and help healthcare workers, so they can stay healthy and continue to serve the Indonesian people," he remarked.

Indonesia has seen a sharp jump in COVID-19 cases triggered by the Delta variant since mid-June 2021.

The government has imposed strict restrictions on people's activities since July 3, 2021 to stem the transmission of the virus.

The Indonesian vaccination program, which was rolled out on January 13, 2021, has prioritized healthcare workers, particularly doctors and nurses. The country has mostly used CoronaVac vaccines bought from Chinese pharmaceutical company Sinovac for the program.

Following the arrival of three million doses of Moderna vaccines donated by the US government, Indonesia has started to administer Moderna jabs to healthcare workers as boosters.

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