Asia-Africa Conference anniversary commemoration expected to boost solidarity

Asia-Africa Conference anniversary commemoration expected to boost solidarity

Retno LP Marsudi. (ANTARA)

This is purely Indonesia`s idea, but it would have not worked unless these countries supported it."
Yogyakarta (ANTARA News) - Indonesia is optimistic that the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Asia-Africa Conference (AAC) this month will strengthen solidarity among countries in Asia and Africa in the fight against poverty and conflicts.

"It is expected to create a new hope for uniting Asian and African countries in their efforts to alleviate poverty, conflicts, wars, and transnational crimes," Indonesias Foreign Minister Retno L.P. Marsudi stated during a national seminar on "Bandung Conference and Beyond 2015" at the Gadjah Mada State University here on Wednesday.

The commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Bandung AAC is scheduled to be held in Jakarta and Bandung, on April 19 to 24.

She hoped that a discussion forum can be organized during the event to strengthen partnership in politics, socio-culture, and economic affairs between member countries.

The results of the discussion could later be implemented through concrete cooperation programs between countries in the two regions, she emphasized.

Similar to other countries, Indonesia could not work alone to fight various national and transnational problems. By strengthening partnership with Asia-Africa countries, Indonesia will be able to contribute more to the world, she pointed out.

Minister Retno noted that one of Bandungs Ten Principles declared by the AAC leaders in Bandung in 1955 to respect the sovereignty and territorial integrity of all countries is still relevant and should be revived again among participants at the upcoming commemoration.

"I think the ten principles are still relevant until now," she stated.

International relations observer at American University Amitav Achary remarked on the occasion that the idea of holding the AAC six decades ago purely came from the host nation, Indonesia.

However, he noted that it also received support from India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Burma.

"This is purely Indonesias idea, but it would have not worked unless these countries supported it," he emphasized.

Amitav noted that 29 countries took part in the conference in 1955. The United States and Britain initially planned to disrupt the meeting as they feared that the event would help to spread communist influence and result in the loss of British colonies due to demands for independence.

"There was fear and propaganda raised by Britain and the United States," he added.

(Reporting by Luqman Hakim/Uu.H-YH/INE/KR-BSR/A014)

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